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The dPS Top Street Photography Tips of 2018

Mon, 12/31/2018 - 13:00

The post The dPS Top Street Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week on dPS we’re featuring some of the top articles in different categories that were published on the site over 2018.

We’ve already shown you the Top All-Round Photography Tips, the Top Photography Gear Tips, the Top Post-Processing Photography Tips, the Top Landscape Photography Tips, the Top Portrait Photography Tips, and the Top Travel Photography Tips of 2018.

This one is all about the best street photography tips of the year.

Here are the top street photography tips articles of 2018: 1. 4 Ways To Make Better Street Portraits While Traveling

4 Ways To Make Better Street Portraits While Traveling

2. Which Street Photography Lens is Right for You?

Which Street Photography Lens is Right for You?

3. 10 Tips for Photographing Street Markets

10 Tips for Photographing Street Markets

4. Panning and Other Tips for Adding Motion to Your Street Photography

Panning and Other Tips for Adding Motion to Your Street Photography

5. 6 Tips for Aiming Low and Going Unnoticed in Street Photography

6 Tips for Aiming Low and Going Unnoticed in Street Photography

6. How to Avoid Distracting Backgrounds in Street Photography

How to Avoid Distracting Backgrounds in Street Photography

7. Tips for Getting Started in Street Photography

Tips for Getting Started in Street Photography

8. 5 Essential Shots You Need to Get for Street Market Photography

5 Essential Shots You Need to Get for Street Market Photography

9. 6 Ways to Improve Your Street Photography

6 Ways to Improve Your Street Photography

10. How To Easily Improve Your Street Photography Portraits

How To Easily Improve Your Street Photography Portraits

We hope you have enjoyed the week of top photography tips and that you learnt some new things from reading them!

The post The dPS Top Street Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Happy New Year 2019 and the Ultimate Guides of 2018!

Mon, 12/31/2018 - 08:00

The post Happy New Year 2019 and the Ultimate Guides of 2018! appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Wishing you the happiest new year from the dPS family. We look forward to bringing you more great tutorials to help you on your photographic journey in 2019!

As a bonus, here is a summary of some amazing dPS Ultimate Guides we published in 2018 that may be helpful for you.

Each is available as a free PDF – just click on the ones you want to download below.

Enjoy, and if you feel these guides are valuable, please share this page with your friends!

The post Happy New Year 2019 and the Ultimate Guides of 2018! appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

The dPS Top Travel Photography Tips of 2018

Sun, 12/30/2018 - 08:00

The post The dPS Top Travel Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week on dPS we’re featuring some of the top articles in different categories that were published on the site over 2018.

We’ve already shown you the Top All-Round Photography Tips, the Top Photography Gear Tips, the Top Post-Processing Photography Tips, the Top Landscape Photography Tips, and the Top Portrait Photography Tips of 2018.

This one is all about the best travel photography tips of the year.

Here are the top travel photography tips articles of 2018: 1. How to Put the Fine Art into Travel Photography

How to Put the Fine Art into Travel Photography

2. Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

Avoid These 5 Major Mistakes Made By Travel Photographers

3. 4 Ways To Make Better Street Portraits While Traveling

4 Ways To Make Better Street Portraits While Traveling

4. The First 10 Things You Need to Buy After Your Camera for Travel Photography

The First 10 Things You Need to Buy After Your Camera for Travel Photography

5. Tips for Making Your Travel Photography Packing List for International Trips

Tips for Making Your Travel Photography Packing List for International Trips

6. 5 Ways to Ensure That You Stay Ahead of the Travel Photography “Game”

5 Ways to Ensure That You Stay Ahead of the Travel Photography “Game”

7. 5 Ways to Find Great Locations for Travel Photography

5 Ways to Find Great Locations for Travel Photography

8. 7 Travel Photography Hacks to Get You Going Places

7 Travel Photography Hacks to Get You Going Places

9. 5 Ways to Photograph Travel Icons

5 Ways to Photograph Travel Icons

10. Travel Photography Secrets That You May Not Have Tried

6 Travel Photography Secrets That You May Not Have Tried

11. 7 Tips to Make Travel Photography Interesting Again

7 Tips to Make Travel Photography Interesting Again

12. Why Olympus Mirrorless Cameras are Top Notch for Travel Photography

Why Olympus Mirrorless Cameras are Top Notch for Travel Photography

13. Tips for Selecting What Gear to Take Along for Travel Photography

Tips for Selecting What Gear to Take Along for Travel Photography

14. Six Non-Photography Tips to Super-Charge Your Travel Photography

Six Non-Photography Tips to Super-Charge Your Travel Photography

15. How to Search Potential Cityscape Photography Spots Online Before Traveling

How to Search Potential Cityscape Photography Spots Online Before Traveling

Next up, we’ll show you the dPS Top Street Photography Tips of 2018.

The post The dPS Top Travel Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

The dPS Top Portrait Photography Tips of 2018

Sat, 12/29/2018 - 08:00

The post The dPS Top Portrait Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week on dPS we’re featuring some of the top articles in different categories that were published on the site over 2018.

We’ve already shown you the Top All-Round Photography Tips, the Top Photography Gear Tips, the Top Post-Processing Photography Tips, and the Top Landscape Photography Tips of 2018.

This one is all about the best portrait photography tips of the year.

Here are the top portrait photography tips articles of 2018: 1. How to Take Unique Crystal Ball Portraits

How to Take Unique Crystal Ball Portraits

2. Video Tutorials – Portrait Posing Tips

Video Tutorials – Portrait Posing Tips

3. Five Common Portrait Retouching Mistakes to Avoid

Five Common Portrait Retouching Mistakes to Avoid

4. Best Camera Settings for Portrait Photography

Best Camera Settings for Portrait Photography

5. 4 Ways To Make Better Street Portraits While Traveling

4 Ways To Make Better Street Portraits While Traveling

6. Five Budget Portrait Photography Hacks to Save You Money

Five Budget Portrait Photography Hacks to Save You Money

7. Tips for Posing People in Outdoor Portraits

Tips for Posing People in Outdoor Portraits

8. How to Choose the Best Portrait Lens According to Three Professional Photographers

How to Choose the Best Portrait Lens According to Three Professional Photographers

9. 3 Simple Ways to Use Framing and Layering in Portraits

3 Simple Ways to Use Framing and Layering in Portraits

10. 5 Tips How to Set Up a Home Studio for Dramatic Portraits

5 Tips How to Set Up a Home Studio for Dramatic Portraits

11. Tips for Doing Natural Light Headshots and Portraits

Tips for Doing Natural Light Headshots and Portraits

12. 5 Creative Indoor Portrait Locations for When the Weather is Blustery

5 Creative Indoor Portrait Locations for When the Weather is Blustery

13. Tips for Using Flash for Beach Portraits

Tips for Using Flash for Beach Portraits

14. How to Make a Dramatic Portrait with Light Painting Using Items Found in Your Home

How to Make a Dramatic Portrait with Light Painting Using Items Found in Your Home

15. 5 Quick Portrait Posing Tips to Flatter Your Subject

5 Quick Portrait Posing Tips to Flatter Your Subject

Up next is the dPS Top Travel Photography Tips of 2018.

The post The dPS Top Portrait Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

The dPS Top Landscape Photography Tips of 2018

Fri, 12/28/2018 - 08:00

The post The dPS Top Landscape Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week on dPS we’re featuring some of the top articles in different categories that were published on the site over 2018.

We’ve already shown you the Top All-Round Photography Tips, the Top Photography Gear Tips, and the Top Post-Processing Photography Tips of 2018.

This one is all about the best landscape photography tips of the year.

Here are the top landscape photography tips articles of 2018: 1. How to Choose the Right ISO for Landscape Photography

How to Choose the Right ISO for Landscape Photography

2. Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

Tips for Shooting Landscape Photography Towards the Sun

3. 5 Tricks to Make Your Landscape Photos Stand Out

5 Tricks to Make Your Landscape Photos Stand Out

4. 3 Techniques and Tips for Photographing the Moon in the Landscape

3 Techniques and Tips for Photographing the Moon in the Landscape

5. 7 Tips to Help You Capture the Perfect Landscape Photo

7 Tips to Help You Capture the Perfect Landscape Photo

6. How to Make Storytelling Landscape Photos – 4 Steps

How to Make Storytelling Landscape Photos – 4 Steps

7. Tips for Shooting Landscapes With a Telephoto Lens

Tips for Shooting Landscapes With a Telephoto Lens

8. Using Layers and Foreground Interest for Better Landscape Photography

Using Layers and Foreground Interest for Better Landscape Photography

9. Understanding Aperture and Landscape Photography – Why F16 Isn’t the Only Choice

Understanding Aperture and Landscape Photography – Why F16 Isn’t the Only Choice

10. Getting Started with Landscape Photography – 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

Getting Started with Landscape Photography – 4 Easy Tips for Beginners

11. How to Add a Sense of Scale to Your Landscape Photos

How to Add a Sense of Scale to Your Landscape Photos

12. 5 Landscape Photography Mistakes That Keep Your Images From Standing Out

5 Landscape Photography Mistakes That Keep Your Images From Standing Out

13. Beginner’s Guide to Natural Light in Landscape Photography

Beginner’s Guide to Natural Light in Landscape Photography

14. How to Work with Different Shutter Speeds for Landscape Photography

How to Work with Different Shutter Speeds for Landscape Photography

15. 7 Landscape Photography Tips You’ll Wish You Knew Earlier

7 Landscape Photography Tips You’ll Wish You Knew Earlier

Next up, we’ll show you the dPS Top Portrait Photography Tips of 2018.

The post The dPS Top Landscape Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

POLL RESULTS – Do You Use Your Camera for Video?

Thu, 12/27/2018 - 13:00

The post POLL RESULTS – Do You Use Your Camera for Video? appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

A week or so ago I asked the question:

Do You Use Your Camera for Video?

Many people voted and the survey results are in.

It looks like almost half voted NO, with 25% using their stills camera for video occasionally.

For that 15 % who said No, but would like to learn or the others who do use their cameras for video, check out these articles below.

The post POLL RESULTS – Do You Use Your Camera for Video? appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

The dPS Top Post-Processing Photography Tips of 2018

Thu, 12/27/2018 - 08:00

The post The dPS Top Post-Processing Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week on dPS we’re featuring some of the top articles in different categories that were published on the site over 2018.

We’ve already shown you the dPS Top All-Round Photography Tips of 2018, and The dPS Top Camera Gear Tips of 2018.

This one is all about the best post-processing tips of the year.

Here are the top post-processing photography tips articles of 2018: 1. 4 Tips to Organize Your Photos in Lightroom

4 Tips to Organize Your Photos in Lightroom

2. How to Create Silky Split Toned Black and White Photos Using Luminosity Masks

How to Create Silky Split Toned Black and White Photos Using Luminosity Masks

3. 6 Essential Steps in any Post-Processing Workflow

6 Essential Steps in any Post-Processing Workflow

4. How to Turn Your Photos into Painterly Style Watercolor Art

How to Turn Your Photos into Painterly Style Watercolor Art

5. Rescue an Image with Split Toning in Adobe Lightroom

How to Rescue an Image in Lightroom With Split Toning

6. How to Create Realistic Bokeh and Blur Effects using Photoshop

How to Create Realistic Bokeh and Blur Effects using Photoshop

7. Five Common Portrait Retouching Mistakes to Avoid

Five Common Portrait Retouching Mistakes to Avoid

8. How to Choose Your Lightroom Export Settings for Printing

How to Choose Your Lightroom Export Settings for Printing

9. How to Edit Food Photography Images Using Lightroom

How to Edit Food Photography Images Using Lightroom

10. How to Take Control of Color in Lightroom

How to Take Control of Color in Lightroom

11. An In-Depth Look at the Range Mask in Lightroom Classic CC

An In-Depth Look at the Range Mask in Lightroom Classic CC

12. Unlocking the Power of the Basic Panel in Lightroom

Unlocking the Power of the Basic Panel in Lightroom

13. 4 Tips For Better Black and White Photos In Lightroom

4 Tips For Better Black and White Photos In Lightroom

14. How to Reduce Digital Noise in Astrophotography Using Exposure Stacking

How to Reduce Digital Noise in Astrophotography Using Exposure Stacking

15. 5 Lightroom Tips and Tricks for Beginners

5 Lightroom Tips and Tricks for Beginners

Next up, we’ll show you the dPS Top Landscape Photography Tips of 2018.

The post The dPS Top Post-Processing Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

The dPS Top Photography Gear Tips of 2018

Wed, 12/26/2018 - 08:00

The post The dPS Top Photography Gear Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week on dPS we’re featuring some of the top articles in different categories that were published on the site over 2018.

Yesterday, we gave you The dPS Top All-Round Photography Tips of 2018.

This one is all about the best Camera Gear Tips of the year.

Here are the top Camera Gear tips articles of 2018: 1. Photography Equipment Comparisons – Entry-Level Versus High-End Gear Does it Matter?

Photography Equipment Comparisons – Entry-Level Versus High-End Gear Does it Matter?

2. 8 Amazing Photography Tricks You Can Do With a High-Speed Camera Trigger

8 Amazing Photography Tricks You Can Do With a High-Speed Camera Trigger

3. 5 Reasons to Use Prime Lenses For Better Photos

5 Reasons to Use Prime Lenses For Better Photos

4. Why Your Camera Gear Doesn’t Matter

Why Your Camera Gear Doesn’t Matter

5. Which Size Lensball is Best for Crystal Ball Photography?

Which Size Lensball is Best for Crystal Ball Photography?

6. 4 Great Pieces of Camera Equipment to Help You Get Creative

4 Great Pieces of Camera Equipment to Help You Get Creative

7. 4 of the Best Lenses for Creative Dog Photography

4 of the Best Lenses for Creative Dog Photography

8. How to Use ND Filters Creatively to Make the Most of a Scene

How to Use ND Filters Creatively to Make the Most of a Scene

9. Review of the Nikon D850 DSLR

Review of the Nikon D850 DSLR

10. The First 10 Things You Need to Buy After Your Camera for Travel Photography

The First 10 Things You Need to Buy After Your Camera for Travel Photography

11. Five Budget Portrait Photography Hacks to Save You Money

Five Budget Portrait Photography Hacks to Save You Money

12. Why I Always Use an L-Plate Bracket for Landscape Photography

Why I Always Use an L-Plate Bracket for Landscape Photography

13. How to Choose the Best Portrait Lens According to Three Professional Photographers

How to Choose the Best Portrait Lens According to Three Professional Photographers

14. Camera Comparison of 3 Popular Nikon Models: D750 – D7100 – D5100

Camera Comparison of 3 Popular Nikon Models: D750 – D7100 – D5100

15. Wide-Angle Versus Telephoto Lenses for Landscape Photography

Wide-Angle Versus Telephoto Lenses for Landscape Photography

Next up, we’ll show you The dPS Top Post-Processing Photography Tips of 2018.

The post The dPS Top Photography Gear Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

The dPS Top Photography Tips of 2018

Tue, 12/25/2018 - 08:00

The post The dPS Top Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

This week on dPS we’re featuring some of the top articles in different categories that were published on the site over 2018.

To begin, this one is all about the best all-round photography tips of the year.

Here are the top all-round photography tips articles of 2018: 1. 3 Misunderstood But Important Buttons on Your Camera Explained

3 Misunderstood But Important Buttons on Your Camera Explained

2. 5 Camera Settings That All Macro Photographers Should Know

5 Camera Settings That All Macro Photographers Should Know

3. Adobe RGB Versus sRGB – Which Color Space Should You Be Using and Why

Adobe RGB Versus sRGB – Which Color Space Should You Be Using and Why

4. 5 Reasons Your Sunrise or Sunset Photos Don’t Look Stunning

5 Reasons Why Your Sunrise or Sunset Photos Don’t Look So Stunning

5. How to Create Colorful Artistic Images Using Oil and Water

How to Create Colorful Artistic Images Using Oil and Water

6. 9 More Great Apps You Need for Your Smartphone

9 More Great Apps You Need for Your Smartphone

7. 8 Ways to Create More Dramatic Flower Photos

8 Ways to Create More Dramatic Flower Photos

8. 4 Tips for Photographing Fog to Create Mystical Images

4 Tips for Photographing Fog to Create Mystical Images

9. A Quick Guide to Using Bounce Flash for More Natural-Looking Photos

A Quick Guide to Using Bounce Flash for More Natural-Looking Photos

10. Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

Five Simple Exercises to Improve your Photography

11. How to Choose the Right ISO for Landscape Photography

How to Choose the Right ISO for Landscape Photography

12. Aperture Versus Shutter Priority – Which Shooting Mode to Use and When

Aperture Versus Shutter Priority – Which Shooting Mode to Use and When

13. Five Ways to Take Your Macro Photography to the Next Level

Five Ways to Take Your Macro Photography to the Next Level

14. 5 Ways to Invest in Your Photography Over the Next 365 Days

5 Ways to Invest in Your Photography Over the Next 365 Days

15. 9 Water Photography Ideas to Make a Splash

9 Water Photography Ideas to Make a Splash

Next up, we’ll show you The dPS Top Photography Gear Tips of 2018.

The post The dPS Top Photography Tips of 2018 appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Happy Holidays 2018 from the dPS Team

Mon, 12/24/2018 - 08:00

The post Happy Holidays 2018 from the dPS Team appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Merry Christmas from the dPS Team! Here in Australia, where most of the team are based, it’s Christmas day already.

Thank you for being a regular reader and fan of dPS and for helping us to continue to provide quality photography education for you and other photography enthusiasts.

However you celebrate this holiday season, we hope you have a fantastic Christmas and Holiday Season.

We look forward to our continued journey together!

Cheers!

The post Happy Holidays 2018 from the dPS Team appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Gear Review: Fujifilm 50-140mm vs 55-200mm

Sun, 12/23/2018 - 08:00

The post Gear Review: Fujifilm 50-140mm vs 55-200mm appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Suzi Pratt.

One of the biggest questions all Fujifilm X-Series users have to contend with is, “which telephoto zoom lens should I buy?” Luckily, there are three great Fujifilm X telephoto lenses to choose from:

All three lenses are fantastic in their own rights, but which one is best for you? In this article, we’ll take a look at two telephoto lenses in particular: the 55-200mm and 50-140mm. Why these two? Because they’re intended to fill the role of the standard 70-200mm zoom lens, an important tool in every professional photographer’s gear kit. If you’re unfamiliar with Fujifilm, note that all X-Series cameras are crop sensors, so these lenses have a 35mm equivalent.

Specifications Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8R LM OIS
  • Released in June 2013
  • Price (MSRP): $699 USD
  • 35mm Equivalent: 83.6-304mm
  • Aperture Range: f/3.5-4.8
  • Dimensions: 75mm (diameter) x 118mm-177mm (length)
  • Weight: 633 grams (with hood and caps)
  • Image Stabilization (OIS): Yes
  • Weather Sealed: No
Fujinon 50-140mm f/2.8 OIS
  • Released in November 2014
  • Price (MSRP): $1599 USD
  • 35mm Equivalent: 76-212.8mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2.8
  • Dimensions: 82.9mm (diameter) x 175.9mm (length)
  • Weight: 1,184 grams (with hood and caps)
  • Image Stabilization (OIS): Yes
  • Weather Sealed: Yes

Specs Summary

Based on specs alone, there are big differences between these two lenses. The 50-140mm is much larger, heavier, and more expensive. Although, it doesn’t even cover nearly as much range as the 55-200mm. What gives? For starters, the 50-140mm is one of few Fujifilm lenses to receive the Red XF Zoom Badge. It’s similar in concept to Canon’s L-lens designation, indicating that red badge lenses are more premium and geared toward professionals.

There are two qualities in particular that make the 50-140mm more premium: weather sealing, and the constant f/2.8 aperture. Both features make this lens more flexible in terms of shooting in bad weather and in low lighting conditions. Both important features for professional photographers. Unfortunately, that also means the price is much higher with the 50-140mm costing more than double the 55-200mm.

Build quality

Specs aside, let’s talk about how these two lenses compare in terms of handling and physical construction.

Buttons and rings

Both telephoto lenses are made of a combination of metal and rubber. There’s a rubber ring to control the zoom and another rubber ring for manual focus. The lenses also have Fujifilm’s signature aperture ring that allows the user to twist to select the aperture. There’s a key difference in that the 50-140mm has a marked Auto Aperture ring, whereas this takes the form of a switch on the 55-200mm. Both lenses also have a switch to turn OIS on or off.

Zoom

Another big difference between these lenses is how they zoom. The 55-200mm has an external zoom, which means it extends as the zoom ring is turned. When fully extended, the 55-200mm is nearly the same length as the 50-140mm. This can be positive in that the lens ends up being quite compact when not fully extended. However, when fully extended, there’s an added risk of damaging the lens. On the other hand, the 50-140mm lens zooms internally, meaning it physically remains the same length even as you zoom in and out.

Lens Hoods

Both the 50-140mm and 55-200mm come with plastic lens hoods. The 50-140mm’s lens hood is scalloped and has an opening allowing easy access to lens filters (ie. circular polarizers).

Tripod collar

Likely due to its size and weight, the 50-140mm comes with a metal tripod collar. This allows for the lens to be mounted to a tripod, rather than the camera body, resulting in better overall balance. The tripod collar has several knobs that allow it to easily be turned in any position, or removed altogether. Compared to other telephoto zooms such as the Canon 70-200mm f/2.8, Fujifilm’s tripod collar is much lighter and easier to remove. Overall, the tripod collar seems to be one of the best and most surprising features of this lens.

The 55-200mm lens does come with a tripod collar.

Lens performance

Let’s start with the 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 lens as its price point and size makes it the easiest to add to your kit. Overall, the lens performs extremely well. Images are sharp and in focus. Even when shooting at 200mm f/4.8, image bokeh is smooth and there’s a good separation between the photo subject and background. However, it’s still a variable aperture lens. When shooting in low lighting or needing to isolate your subject with creamy bokeh background, this lens is blown out of the water by the 50-140mm.

The 50-140mm at f/2.8 performs incredibly well in low lighting.

Moving on to the 50-140mm f/2.8 lens. This lens is definitely much beefier and you’ll need more room in your bag to lug it around. Its size can make it an awkward match for some of Fujifilm’s more compact cameras such as the X-E bodies. If your camera comes with an optional battery grip, using it can help the lens and camera feel more balanced. Personally, I had a hard time turning the aperture ring with the tripod collar attached, although the collar did help hold the lens steady.

In terms of image quality, the 50-140mm offers sharp, crisp images at all focal lengths and apertures. It has an obvious upper hand when it comes to low light shooting and bokeh with that f/2.8. However, if you’ve gotten used to shooting with the 55-200mm, you might miss that extra zoom range that you can’t get with the 50-140mm.

55-200mm at 55mm f/3.5

50-140mm lens at 140mm f/2.8

Conclusion

So which of these two Fujifilm telephoto lenses is best for you? It’s hard to say. If you’re on a budget, don’t want a bulky lens, or don’t shoot in a lot of low lighting scenarios, the 55-200mm is a great deal that will still give you sharp, clear images. However, if your budget can stretch a bit and you really value having a constant f/2.8 aperture, splurge on the 50-140mm. Despite being larger, pricier, and offering less range, the 50-140mm is a sturdy, reliable lens that will last you a long time.

Video

?

 

50-140mm lens at 140mm f/11

55-200mm at 200mm f/11

55-200mm

50-140mm

Have you used either of these lenses? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

The post Gear Review: Fujifilm 50-140mm vs 55-200mm appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Suzi Pratt.

How to Use High-Speed Video to Capture Action Photos

Sat, 12/22/2018 - 13:00

The post How to Use High-Speed Video to Capture Action Photos appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Peter West Carey.

Sometimes 6, 7 or 12 frames per second (fps) isn’t fast enough to get the shot you want. Sometimes the action is so fast it is best to use a different concept altogether. I’m talking specifically about how to use high-speed video to capture action photos that you want.

Think of it this way; standard frame rate for video is either 24fps or 30fps. That’s good, but may not be fast enough. Most smartphones these days can shoot 120fps, which makes them a possible tool for this technique. Or you can step up to a camera with much higher frame rates, maybe 480fps or even 1000fps.

No matter the camera, the technique below opens up a world of possibilities for freezing high-speed action.

I had a request from my client Andy Suzuki & The Method to capture slow-motion burning clocks for a music video, which turned out to be perfect material for this post.

Shooting

When shooting at a high speed, lighting can be critical, as it is with any quality photography. The high frame rate should be accompanied by a higher shutter speed, which can be accomplished with more light, an open aperture and higher ISO.

There are benefits and drawbacks to increasing each of these factors that depend on your intended outcome. I find Adobe Lightroom does a good job of cleaning up most ISO noise, so I prefer to increase the ISO before anything.

Adding more light is the next variable I would adjust. Although, as you can see in my example here, it was not an option. Next, I will adjust the aperture as open as I can make it while still ensuring my depth of field is adequate for my subject.

Grabbing the frame in Lightroom

Grabbing the appropriate frame in Lightroom is incredibly simple.

Downloading your video in Lightroom, and while in the Library Module, play your video until you get to the frame you desire. When you find it, hit ‘pause’. The forward and backward arrows can be used to step your video frame-by-frame until you find the frame you need. You can run this exercise multiple times if you need or want multiple frames.

Once you have the frame you want on your screen, click on the rectangle at the bottom of the preview area.

There will be two options Capture frame and Set poster frame. Simply click Capture frame and a JPG of the frame will be stacked with the video.

The capture will be the same size as the original video. In this case, with high-speed video on a Sony RX-100 V, as demonstrated here, the image is 1920×1080. There will be some balance you need to strike in order to ensure the final image is large enough for your intended use.

Conclusion

High-speed video is an excellent way to produce images it would take hours to capture. Think of splashing on puddles, wine poured into a glass, breaking ice or any number of fast-moving subjects. The method described here does have some limitations, but it is fast, easy and just a bit of fun.

The post How to Use High-Speed Video to Capture Action Photos appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Peter West Carey.

Day 6: Take Your Photography to Expert Level with The Photography Express

Sat, 12/22/2018 - 08:16

The post Day 6: Take Your Photography to Expert Level with The Photography Express appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Darren Rowse.

Ready to take things to expert level? Fittingly, this is the last stop for The Photography Express – two amazing deals from Josh Dunlop at Expert Photography.

Want to go straight to the deals?

Over 50,000 students in 138 countries have benefited from the passion Josh has for photography. And many dPS readers enjoyed the Milky Way Mastery course he presented with Casey Kiernan last year – and they’re back collaborating again in a new course (see the second of our deals below).

Deal #11 Learn 30 ‘Wow Factor Photography’ Shots for just $77 USD

Do you want to take the kinds of photos that make people say “Wow! How’d you take that?”

You can learn how to capture impressive creative and trick photography, with basic gear, all from the comfort of your own home. Josh Dunlop from Expert Photography is offering 40% off this amazing course exclusively for dPS. Some of the shots include:

  • Picasso Style Cross Section Portrait
  • Hidden Camera Mirror Trick
  • Water Splash Photography
  • Steel Wool Photography
  • Bubble Photography
  • Harris Shutter Effect

30 great shots in total, taught step-by-step in detail will keep your busy for weeks and your social media will never look the same again! Josh even shows you how to post your amazing photos to Facebook and Instagram so you can share your new skills.

Now only $77 USD (Save $120) for just 24 hours only!

Check out the deal and sample lesson now

Maybe you want some magic after the shot? Josh has you covered there too in this collaboration course with Casey Kiernan.

Deal #12 Effortless Editing with Lightroom for just $77 USD

Do you want to professionally edit hundreds of photos in minutes… not hours?

NEW course – Effortless Editing with Lightroom provides a simple way to edit your photos so quickly and beautifully that your friends beg you for prints. This always-up-to-date course is Josh Dunlop’s best selling course ever and he’s giving it to you for 40% off.

In addition to learning the exact workflow Josh and Casey use 100% of the time, they’ll also teach you:

  • The best way to fix skin blemishes in just a few clicks
  • Why most photographers skip the lens correction… and how you can use this tool to your advantage
  • The lazy way to create panoramas without exporting to Photoshop or cropping
  • Where and how to crop and straighten for maximum results (because YES, cropping is OK!)
  • The do’s and don’ts of vignetting and dehazing
  • The hidden preview for your sharpening sliders that professionals always use
  • How to transform the perspective of your photo with the click of a button
  • And much, much more…

How much is your time worth and how much would you rather be out shooting than burning hours at your screen?

Now only $77 USD (save $120) for just 24 hours only!

Check out the deal and stunning before and afters here

We hope you’ve enjoyed your visits from The Photography Express this year and that you’ve been able to pick up some great deals to keep your photography sharp going into 2019.

Josh offers a very generous 90-day money back guarantee, so you really have nothing to lose and a whole lot of skill to gain. And he usually has more than a couple of surprise bonuses too – so it’s worth checking out the deals!

Disclosure: We receive a commission from our partners if you buy via our promotion, but it is at no cost to you. In fact, you’re getting an even better price than usual!

The post Day 6: Take Your Photography to Expert Level with The Photography Express appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Darren Rowse.

How to Use the NIK Filter Collection with Photoshop

Sat, 12/22/2018 - 08:00

The post How to Use the NIK Filter Collection with Photoshop appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Have you downloaded the NIK filter collection but now you don’t know how to use it? It’s great to have all these tools available, but they can be daunting to use for the first time. When there are so many choices available, it’s difficult to choose or even figure out where to start. So, keep reading for a quick introductory guide to the Nik filter interface.

Launch Photoshop

When you launch Photoshop, the Nik Filter Panel launches too. This panel is independent of the Photoshop interface. You can move it around your screen, minimize or close it without affecting Photoshop.

If you close it and want to open it again without re-launching Photoshop, go to Menu -> File -> Automate -> Nik Collection Selective Tool. If you don’t want the entire panel, but a specific filter you can go to Menu -> Filters -> Nik Collection and choose the one you want from the menu. However, keep in mind that this option is only active if you have already opened an image.

While I’m using Color Efex Pro to show you around, this tutorial is an introduction to the entire collection. Therefore, I won’t go into much detail about this or any other particular filter. Instead, I discuss only what they share. When you launch the desired filter, a window pops up. This window has a canvas area where you can see the image and one or two adjustment panels on the side.

*Note that Dfine, Viveza and Sharpener Pro only have the adjustment panel on the right.

Canvas

Let’s start with the Canvas. Canvas is the area where you can see your image and the adjustments you’re making to it. First of all, you can change the background color so that you can best appreciate the photo. By clicking the button on top that has a lightbulb in it, you can switch to black, white or grey.

The default setting displays the canvas and the panels, that way you can see what you’re doing. However, you can hide the panels at any time by clicking the buttons on the top corner(s). You can also press the Tab key on your keyboard for this.

View Modes

Still on the top bar, and regardless of how many panels you have shown, there’s always the display choices. You can have the Single Image Mode that shows your entire image with the adjustments. To see the original image, you can click the Compare button.

Using the Compare button gives you a side by side comparison or a split image comparison. The two buttons are on top next to the Single View one.

Categories

Regarding panels, on the left, you’ll have the available filters when you are in Color Efex Pro, HDR Efex Pro, Analogue Pro, Silver Efex Pro. In this section, you can see all the possible filters or narrow down the choices by category.

Also, in most of them (except Color Efex Pro), you’ll have a thumbnail preview of them.

Recipes

Below the categories and filters, you’ll find the Recipes. Presets and Recipes are a combination of filters that allow you to apply multiple filters and adjustments with one click. These are handy if you’re a beginner and want to have options that are more automized. However, you can create your own so that you can apply the same adjustments to multiple images. It’s a very useful tool.

Be careful not to apply it after you’ve already made some adjustments because they get overwritten by the recipe.

Note: If you change your mind about the recipe or anything else you’ve done, you’ll find the History button at the bottom where you can retrace your steps and go back.

Adjustments

On the right panel, you’ll have all the adjustments to personalize the filter or effect that you’re working on. This is available in all of the filters, but each one has different choices and possibilities.

 

Finally, when you click OK at the bottom, the changes get applied as a new layer on top of the original image.

Brush

However, if you only want to apply it to specific areas, click on Brush instead of clicking OK. That way, it gets applied as a layer mask. Then you can ‘paint’ the changes onto the desired parts. When you’re done, click Apply on the bottom of the Nik panel.

Conclusion

I hope you feel a bit more confident to start moving around the settings and finding your way into all the potential these filters offer. Remember, you can always go back a step or two when making changes. Also, don’t be afraid of damaging your original file while you learn because any changes are made on a separate layer. Most of all get creative and enjoy.

Have you used the collection? What are your thoughts?

You may also find these articles helpful:

How to Boost Your Creativity with Lightroom Presets

How to Use Import and Export Presets in Lightroom Classic CC

How to Make Creative Lightroom Develop Presets for Portraits

The post How to Use the NIK Filter Collection with Photoshop appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Weekly Photography Challenge – Christmas Lights

Fri, 12/21/2018 - 13:00

The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Christmas Lights appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

In the spirit of the Christmas season, this week’s photography challenge topic is CHRISTMAS LIGHTS!

You could take portraits using christmas/fairy lights, use the lights for creative bokeh, photograph Christmas trees or houses all lit up. So many possibilities!

Some Instagram Inspiration:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Brandon Woelfel (@brandonwoelfel) on Nov 27, 2017 at 9:17pm PST

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Chris Spoons (@chris.spoons) on Dec 16, 2018 at 5:57am PST

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Iggy & Michalina (@kanapowy_team) on Dec 15, 2018 at 5:19am PST

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Alyssa (@justagirlwithbraids) on Dec 13, 2018 at 8:07pm PST

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Nikolay Dimitrov (@nikolay_dimitrov_photography) on Dec 25, 2017 at 12:33am PST

Check out some of the articles below that give you tips on this week’s challenge.

Tips for Shooting Christmas Lights

Step-by-step Guide to Long Exposure Photography

6 Tips for Shooting Long Exposure Night Photographs

How to Take Photos of Kids with a Christmas Tree Bokeh Background

How to Take Beautiful Bokeh Christmas Images [With 39 Stunning Examples]

 

 

Weekly Photography Challenge – Christmas Lights

Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer, upload them to your favorite photo-sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge.

 

Share in the dPS Facebook Group

You can also share your images in the dPS Facebook group as the challenge is posted there each week as well.

If you tag your photos on Flickr, Instagram, Twitter or other sites – tag them as #DPSChristmasLights to help others find them. Linking back to this page might also help others know what you’re doing so that they can share in the fun.

 

The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Christmas Lights appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

Day 5: 24 Photography eBooks, $9 each, 24 hours only

Fri, 12/21/2018 - 08:10

The post Day 5: 24 Photography eBooks, $9 each, 24 hours only appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Darren Rowse.

If you’ve been eyeing off some of our dPS titles, waiting for a sale, it’s time to make like a squirrel and go nuts! We’ve got the full Photo Nuts collection for 80% off and the rest of our eBooks just $9 USD.

We know that some of you may already have these titles. If so, please consider forwarding these offers to a friend who you’ve inspired with your own photography. We’d also love you to hit reply and tell us what topics you’d like covered in new eBooks or courses in 2019.

Deal #9 Learn the Nuts and Bolts of Photography with this Classic Collection 80% off

If you missed the recent 31 Days to Becoming a Better Photographer course, and you enjoy learning at your own convenience and pace, Neil Creek has covered all the fundamentals of photography in these Video Courses and Ebooks. You’ll be taking beautiful images in no time.

The collection includes:

  • Photo Nuts & Bolts Course – Normally $99
  • Photo Nuts & Shots Course – Normally $99
  • Photo Nuts & Bolts eBook – Normally $29
  • Photo Nuts & Shots eBook – Normally $29
  • Photo Nuts & Gear eBook – Normally $29
  • Photo Nuts & Post eBook – Normally $19

Pretty much everything you need to get off auto and confidently enjoy your photography.

Just $59 USD you save $245 (that’s 80% off) for just 24 hours only!

Take me to the deal

Looking to learn something new over the holidays? Browse our eBook titles and find something you can get started on this holiday season.

Deal #10 All dPS eBooks just $9 USD

With 24 titles in our eBook store there’s loads to choose from. If you see more than one that you like you can create your own little bundle of photography training and still not break the budget.

Includes our latest release Wedding Photography eBook and our most valuable title Going Pro (save 80% on this one). Other popular titles include:

All eBooks just $9 (save up to 80%) for just 24 hours only!

See all eBooks on sale

We hope you find a gem or two among our collection to learn something new for 2019.

We offer a 60-day money back guarantee, so you can easily buy now to secure the deal and if it’s not right for you, we’ll refund you.

Don’t miss the last two deals – sign up here for The Photography Express!

Disclosure: We receive a commission from our partners if you buy via our promotion, but it is at no cost to you. In fact, you’re getting an even better price than usual!

The post Day 5: 24 Photography eBooks, $9 each, 24 hours only appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Darren Rowse.

5 Creative Portrait Lighting Tricks Using Only Phone Light

Fri, 12/21/2018 - 08:00

The post 5 Creative Portrait Lighting Tricks Using Only Phone Light appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

In this video by Derrick Freske, you’ll learn 5 creative portrait lighting tricks using only phone light!

?

Using only a phone light and some handy reflective props, you can achieve some of the great portrait photography looks in Derrick’s video.

Derrick’s tricks include using:
  1. A disco ball
  2. Scrapbooking paper
  3. Sequinned fabric
  4. Lace fabric
  5. Prism

Try these out and we’d love to see some in the comments section below.

Follow Derrick Freske on Instagram.

 

You may also find the following articles helpful:

How to use Colored Gels to Create Unique and Creative Portraits

How to Make a Dramatic Portrait with Light Painting Using Items Found in Your Home

Tips for Planning and Capturing a Creative Portrait

How to Make Unique Portraits Using Light Painting

One Speedlight Portrait Lighting Tutorial

The post 5 Creative Portrait Lighting Tricks Using Only Phone Light appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

5 Ways to Apply Artistic Expression for Memorable Photography

Thu, 12/20/2018 - 13:00

The post 5 Ways to Apply Artistic Expression for Memorable Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jeremy Flint.

Rickshaw rider, Kathmandu, Nepal © Jeremy Flint

Photography can be a wonderful way to express your creativity and artistic flair. Artistic expression is all about you and allowing yourself the freedom in your photography to satisfy your visual curiosity. Fundamentally, it is a means to fuel your imagination and a way of being artful, according to your mood. The subject matter is entirely your choice, whether you decide to capture wildlife, landscapes, architecture or abstract scenes.

You can apply photography techniques that inspire you, from motion blur to creative arrangements. Alternatively, work with what you find.

Here are 5 ways you can use artistic expression in your photography to capture some memorable shots:

1. Sharpness and blur

Freezing the action of your chosen subject can be achieved with short exposure times and result in sharper images. Photography doesn’t have to be about capturing the beauty of a scene in its sharpest and most natural form. You can be playful in your creations and apply a bit of artistic blur from time to time. Adding artistic blur is a great way to put some art and movement into your photographs.

Sharp images are dynamic and provide an obvious and real static representation of a scene. However, using blur can make an image more compelling. Using a slower shutter speed helps to provide motion and movement to photographs while adding drama and vitality.

Hyena Pan, Tanzania © Jeremy Flint

2. Light trails at night

At nighttime, as darkness falls, lights come on and provide excellent subjects to capture. Roads become lit by light trails from vehicles that give unique patterns.

© Jeremy Flint

Fairgrounds are great for artistic shots. This is due to their unique atmosphere, as well as the fairground’s color and excitement. Be inventive and artistic in your approach to capturing these scenes. Look for elements such as the vibrant and attractive Christmas lights and car light trails as shown in the image below.

London Xmas Lights © Jeremy Flint

3. Shoot a silhouette

While many shots taken during daylight hours tend to show all details in an image, get creative by shooting a silhouette. You can achieve a silhouette by mainly photographing a subject’s outline and making it featureless against a bright background.

Stonehenge, Wiltshire, UK © Jeremy Flint

In the image example here, I have used the famous landmark of Stonehenge in the UK with a vibrant sky behind. Make sure you choose a strong subject for a silhouette such as the distinct shape of a person or animal. The best way to shoot a silhouette is to position your subject in front of a bright background and to expose for the background, rendering your subject dark and underexposed.

© Jeremy Flint

Silhouettes are an interesting way to convey drama and energy into your images and makes them stand out.

4. Shoot an abstract

Abstract photography can be made up of several characteristics. Usually, abstraction takes place when a photographer focuses on a section of a natural scene isolating it from its context. This could be a color, texture, line, shape, geometry, symmetry or reflection of a scene. The photographer changes our perception of the real and familiar subject or object. The viewer doesn’t immediately recognize it.

Abstraction facilitates a move away from the specific, the concrete and the obvious. You achieve abstraction by isolating, or eliminating an object and its texture, shape, and form. Color and tones can become strong elements in an abstract photograph.

Slot Canyon, Arizona, USA © Jeremy Flint

Details can be used to create abstract photographs by moving closer to our subjects. Alternatively, you can achieve abstraction through movement. Through subject motion, photographer motion, camera movement or a combination of any of these, information gets reduced, and impressions are created. For example, moving the camera upwards or downwards when photographing trees leaves behind colors, patterns, and lines.

5. Find patterns

Patterns are a wonderful way to add interest to your abstract photography. Our day to day visual life consists of patterns, shapes, and textures that evoke a certain mood or atmosphere.

We are visually drawn to patterns because they provide us with a graphic element that looks appealing and interesting.

© Jeremy Flint

Photographing patterns can make for good compositions. For example, you could show a small area of a broader subject. Macro lenses can be used to get in close and add more interest.

Conclusion

Learning to apply artistic expression in your photos can be a great way to create intriguing and unusual images that make a viewer stop and think about your image. Try out the 5 techniques outlined above and share your images with us below.

The post 5 Ways to Apply Artistic Expression for Memorable Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jeremy Flint.

Day 4 Delivery from The Photography Express

Thu, 12/20/2018 - 08:10

The post Day 4 Delivery from The Photography Express appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Darren Rowse.

Regardless how we celebrate this time of year, we generally want to spend time with the people we care about. Which makes for excellent, and sometimes rare, opportunities to capture those memories.

Today’s deals from The Photography Express will hopefully provide everything you need to learn about taking family photos (hold the awkward) and amazing portraits of friends and loved ones. Say no to poorly lit or composed shots that will never make it into a photo frame or quirky family calendar.

Want to go straight to the deals?

 

Deal #7 Massive dPS Portrait Photography Sale

 

Everything you need to take amazing portraits in the Holidays and New Year! Pick and choose to create your own Portrait Photography Bundle with up to 60% off our portrait collection. There’s a video course, presets, and eBooks from top professional photographers from just $9. Already have a few? Then just grab the ones you don’t!

Save 50- 60% for the next 24 hours only! Offer ends 03:00AM PST Friday 21st December.

Shop the collection now 

 

Deal #8 Dynamic Natural Light Set-Up Mini Course with Cole’s Classroom

The “missing link” to giving you jaw dropping, powerful natural light photos. Discover how Marissa transforms ordinary, flat and boring natural light indoors to powerful, flattering and beautiful light that anyone can learn how to set-up.

Valued at $59 you can grab the Dynamic Natural Lighting Behind the Scenes + Complete Set-Up Video (Downloadable) + Quick Guide with Lighting Diagrams, Gear Used, How to Set-Up & More (PDF) for just $9.99.

Just $9.99 (Save 80%) for the next 24 hours only! Offer ends 03:00AM PST Friday 21st December.

Grab this deal now

Have fun implementing what you learn to take gorgeous portraits these holidays and beyond.

Both deals come with money back guarantees (dPS 60 days and our trusted partner Cole’s Classroom 30 days), so you can easily buy now to secure the deal and if you don’t think they’re for you, you’ll get refunded.

Don’t miss the next two deals – sign up here for The Photography Express!

Disclosure: We receive a commission from our partners if you buy via our promotion, but it is at no cost to you. In fact, you’re getting an even better price than usual!

The post Day 4 Delivery from The Photography Express appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Darren Rowse.

3 Practical Tips to Improve Your Blue Hour Photography

Thu, 12/20/2018 - 08:00

The post 3 Practical Tips to Improve Your Blue Hour Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Nisha Ramroop.

Most people are familiar with the term Golden Hour – used to describe that time just after the sun rises or just before it sets. The light is soft, extraordinary and sought out by many. However, if you pack up your gear when the sun drops below the horizon, you are missing out on another magical time!

Also known as twilight, Blue Hour refers to that time of the day just before or after the Golden Hour. Depending on your location, it may be shorter (or longer) than an hour but happens before sunrise or after sunset. If you want to capture images of this amazing time of day, here are a few tips to help you get started.

1. Timing is everything

There is a unique quality of light available at blue hour. The sky has a vivid hue of blue and purple. Perhaps even hints of your fallen sunset, cresting sunrise colors: yellow, orange and red. In either case, the sun is below the horizon, but its light is indirect and still visible. If you are shooting cityscapes after sunset, wait for the lights to come on and for the sky to darken a little, so you can shoot longer exposures.

As mentioned above, depending on your location your Blue “Hour” will vary. If you are closer to the equator, both the Golden and Blue “Hours” are shorter. Similarly, you have more shooting time when further away from the equator. Blue Hour times vary by season and, depending on the time of year and location, may not even occur immediately before or after the Golden Hours. There are locations where blue hour happens up to forty-five minutes after sunset!

When in an unfamiliar environment (e.g. traveling), one option is to get there early and wait. There are also apps and websites available to help you determine Blue Hour based on location. If you use the latter, scouting your environment beforehand still proves useful.

2. Keep it steady

Same location as above, but at a different time of the year

You may get away with shooting sunrises and sunsets without a tripod, but it is non-negotiable for blue hour. This is especially true if you want to shoot cityscapes with a smaller aperture (to get those beautiful starbursts). A tripod is a must for long exposures and allows you to shoot at lower ISOs, thus reducing noise in your images.

You can further reduce camera shake by using a remote shutter release. This useful gadget helps you minimize touching the camera. If you do not have a remote, use your camera’s timer, so that the image is taken a few seconds after you press the shutter button.

Bonus tip: Long exposures use more battery power, so pack a few spares.

3. What settings?

There is some flexibility when it comes to Blue Hour photography, depending on your subject.

If you are shooting a cityscape or skyline, most likely you want to keep your buildings sharp. In an image like this, your depth of field (f-number) will determine your settings. You can start at f/8 and go higher – keeping in mind that a higher f-number means a slower shutter speed.

If you are shooting light trails from cars against your blue sky, your shutter speed will determine your settings. This interesting subject comes to life with slower shutter speeds. On the other hand, if you want to freeze action in your Blue Hour, you need faster shutter speeds. Due to the lower light available during Blue Hour, this may mean shooting at lower f-numbers and increasing your ISO.

Conclusion

Blue hour is a beautiful part of the day that is often overlooked for the more popular Golden Hour. It is an amazing time to experiment with different captures and challenge yourself to work quickly in your limited “hour”. Plan ahead and envision your outcome, so you can maximize this time of day. Cityscapes and other subjects can come alive due to the unique quality of light available. Experiment, have fun and share some of your Blue Hour photography below.

The post 3 Practical Tips to Improve Your Blue Hour Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Nisha Ramroop.

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